Employers Guide

GUIDE FOR EMPLOYERS AND INDIVIDUALS

[ An evaluation of hydraulic hazard exposure ]

This information does not itself determine compliance responsibilities. Interpretations may change over time; for additional guidance on exposure classifications you should consult current administrative interpretations and decisions by occupational health and safety professionals with specific knowledge of hydraulic related hazards.

Many occupational Standards and regulations explicitly require the employer to train employees in the safety and health aspects of their jobs. OH&S standards make it the employer’s legal responsibility to limit certain tasks to employees who are “certified”, “competent” or “qualified” – meaning that they have had special previous training to perform specific duties and are made aware of related hazards. Training must be part of every employer’s safety and health program for protecting workers from injuries and illnesses. Research concludes that those who are new on the job have a higher rate of incidents and injuries compared to more experienced workers.

The International Hydraulic Safety Authority has developed voluntary training guidelines to assist employers and personnel in providing safety and health information needed to work at reduced risk to themselves and the environment.

The development of the guidelines can assist employers in their efforts to meet the training requirements in current or future occupational safety and health standards.

IHSA does not intend to make the guidelines mandatory. And they should not be used by employers as a total or complete guide in training and education.

Health and safety training should be provided before incidents occur. Hydraulic Safety training covers both general and specific safety issues surrounding hydraulic related procedures, too the mere hazards of unrelated exposure. Similar to any other training, Hydraulic Safety training would be repeated if an incident or near miss incident occurred.

MATCHING TRAINING TO EMPLOYEE

Employers are often faced with the problem of deciding who is at risk of incident from exposure to hydraulic systems. Who is in greatest need of information and instruction. One way to differentiate between employees who have priority needs for training and those who do not is to identify the occupation and the employees’ specific duties which are at higher levels of risk. The nature of the duties and tasks performed will provide an indication that such employees should receive priority for information on hydraulic safety.

EMPLOYEES AT RISK

One method of identifying employees at high levels of occupational risk is to identify hazardous occupations. Even within hazardous occupations some personnel operate at greater risk than others.

 

DETERMINING A LEVEL OF TRAINING

Narrowing down ones exposure to hydraulic hazards maybe achieved through the design of a task or job hazard analysis. However futile, should the individual performing the analysis not be competent in understanding the hazards of hydraulics ?

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION CAN HELP EMPLOYERS IDENTIFY AN EMPLOYEE’S LEVEL OF NEED OF HYDRAULIC SAFETY TRAINING.
In an aXempt to assist employers, it maybe first necessary to determine whether hydraulic systems are used in your facility. It should be also determined if hydraulics systems are utilized by employees outside your facility. In the case of uncertainty, it maybe necessary too consult with others within the company, or by utilizing consultants who can determine the use of hydraulics by your facility.

Supervisors of employees, who are identified as having exposure to hydraulic systems, regardless of the level, should receive priority training in either Exposure Level or High Risk Maintenance level hydraulic safety training. Supervisors, Human Resource, and Safety Coordinators are encouraged to speak with an IHSA representative to determine their level of training. Consulting and training of key personnel such as supervisors, human resource, and safety coordinators is a proactive method which intern will result in determining training level requirements of all employees.

The IHSA training courses are not designed and developed as prerequisites to one another. The Exposure level course is a derivative of the High Risk Maintenance course, a hierarchy of knowledge relates these two courses.

A few simple questions to help determine the level of training to be incorporated ;
DO WE OR I :
A). Use hydraulics in our facility for plant processes.
B). Have mobile or construction equipment.
C). Have personnel that maintain equipment that utilizes hydraulics.
D). Have employees who work within 1 meter of a hydraulic system or component.
E). Have personnel who operate equipment that utilizes hydraulics, in public areas.
F). Operate hydraulic equipment in fragile ecosystems.
Once the employees training needs have been identified; the employee should enrolled in the best suited level of training.

This guideline is intended to help determine exposure to hydraulic hazards in the workplace. Consider hydraulics hazards do exist outside the workplace. For example; a bank teller will rate in the green, having liXle to no occupational exposure in the workplace, however outside the workplace some are exposed to tractors, lawnmowers, wood spliXers, jacks, steering and tilt on boats, brakes on vehicles, and rental equipment, all utilizing hydraulics.

Maintenance, reliability, ethical choices, and knowledge play a substantial roll in risk reduction.

ARE YOU EXPOSED TO HYDRAULICS ?

  • Do you operate hydraulic equipment
  • Do you operate fork liTs or elevating devices
  • Do you work on heavy construction
  • Do you drive delivery trucks
  • have sat in a hair dresser/barber chair
  • Do you travel in elevators of less than 5 floors
  • Do you service automated equipment
  • Do you operate farm equipment
  • Have you ever used a wood splitter
  • Do you make hydraulic hose assemblies
  • Do you repair industrial equipment
  • Do you frequently pass hydraulic equipment
  • Is hydraulics used in you work place
  • Have you driven through automatic car washer
  • Will hydraulic equipment be at your next place of work
  • Do you rent equipment
  • Have you driven past construction and agriculture equipment on public roadways
  • Have you been on amusement rides
  • Do you service and maintain aircraft
  • Do you work in a marine environment
  • Are you a supervisor or manager
  • Do you manage plant/site operations
  • Are you a health and safety officer
  • Are you responsible for site/plant orientations
  • Do you make company purchases
  • Does your company have environmental policies
  • Do you understand the functions of the equipment your personnel operate and maintain
  • Are you licensed under the province in a trade
  • Who is responsible for you actions and your safety
  • Are you a safety consultant who performs prestart health and safety reviews

Educational requirements based on level of exposure to a hydraulic Hazard.
The following 520 occupations are occupations listed in the Canada Immigration data base. Job descriptions and duties vary throughout an occupation, therefore the titled occupation alone is not to determine your exposure to hydraulic systems. This rating is only acts as a guide which scales the less likely to most likely.

GREEN SCALE LESS LIKELY

Hydraulic hazard exposure; an individual does not work within 1 meter of a hydraulic system.
Recommend EXPOSURE LEVEL TRAINING.

YELLOW SCALE MEDIUM RISK

Hydraulic hazard exposure; working within 1 meter of a functioning hydraulic system. Operating hydraulic equipment. Possible contact with fluids.
Recommend EXPOSURE LEVEL TRAINING.

RED SCALE MOST LIKELY

Hydraulic hazard exposure; maintaining and repairing hydraulic systems and components. Physical contact with hydraulic components and fluids. Tasks which include design, assembly, commissioning, decommissioning, demolition of equipment which utilize hydraulics.
Recommend HIGH RISK MAINTENANCE LEVEL TRAINING.

OCCUPATIONS EXPOSED TO HYDRAULICS :